Cap Times Live presents Proud Parents


Session sponsored by Monona Bank, Goodman’s Jewelers and Lake Louie Brewing.

Moderator: Rob Thomas
Panelist: Proud Parents

Starting in Madison as the musical culmination of a decade of friendship and playing in punk bands, C Nelson-Lifson (they/them) and Tyler Fassnacht (he/him) began writing the first of Proud Parents’ jangly, garage-infused pop tunes in C’s living room in 2014. Shortly thereafter, Heather Sawyer (she/her) joined on drums and vocals, turning the songwriting duo into a trio, and they quickly garnered a devout following both locally and regionally as a live power-pop force to be reckoned with. The band will play at the High Noon Saloon as our third Cap Times Live concert, and it will be livestreamed via Zoom and Facebook Live. A ticket is not needed to see the livestream. Click here to register for the concert, which will also give you a chance to see the show in person.

Other Sessions

One-on-one with Sara Nelson

Sept. 17, 6:00 p.m.
Sara Nelson and John Nichols
Hailed as the most dynamic labor leader in the United States, Sara Nelson is the president of the Association of Flight Attendants and a key member of the AFL-CIO Executive Council. She will speak with Cap Times associate editor John Nichols about renewing the power of organized labor and her work with Joe Biden and Bernie Sanders to address economic and racial injustice.
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How Trump Broke It

Sept. 17, 7:15 p.m.
Carol Leonnig, David Maraniss and Philip Rucker
Pulitzer-prize winning Washington Post writers Carol Leonnig and Philip Rucker in conversation with colleague David Maraniss about their book “I Alone Can Fix It” and its richly detailed account of the damage the Trump presidency did to American government and democracy.
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Dark Money and Democracy

Godfrey & Kahn
Sept. 18, 11:30 a.m.
David Maraniss and Jane Mayer
The New Yorker’s Jane Mayer, the nation’s leading investigative reporter on the role of dark money in politics, speaks with David Maraniss about attempts to curtail voting rights and the role of Wisconsin’s Bradley Foundation in that effort.
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